Simulation of ethylbenzene dehydrogenation in microporous catalytic membrane reactors.
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Simulation of ethylbenzene dehydrogenation in microporous catalytic membrane reactors.

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Published by U. S. Dept. of Energy. .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Pagination29 p. $0.00 C.1.
Number of Pages29
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17589126M

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  A novel membrane reactor containing stainless-steel-supported zeolite silicalite-1 membrane was used for the catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene packed with an iron oxide catalyst. The zeolite silicalite-1 membrane was formed on a porous, tubular stainless-steel (PTSS) support by a two-stage varying-temperature in situ by: The results demonstrate that with the present catalyst used under typical process conditions (T, P, WHSV, S/O) removal of hydrogen through the membrane gives only a small increase of styrene yield. However, the model predicts that by increasing the reaction pressure in the membrane reactor the kinetic limitation can be overcome and ethylbenzene Cited by: In the same line, Akpa et al. 1 developed fi rst-principles models to estimate the ethylbenzene conversion and the product's selectivity in a catalytic membrane reactor for the dehydrogenation of. In this study the catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene was investigated in a simulated tubular sodalite membrane reactor. The high quality microporous sodalite membrane was synthesized by direct hydrothermal method and characterized by single gas permeation measurements. The performance of the prepared membrane showed high potential for application in a dehydrogenation membrane.

  The catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene in a membrane reactor was studied at ° to °C. The reactor selected in this study is a commercial alumina membrane tube with 40Å pore diameter packed with granular catalysts. One of the reaction products, hydrogen, was separated through the membrane.   Mathematical simulation of catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene in a composite palladium membrane reactor. Journal of Membrane Science , (), DOI: /S(97) Babiker K. Abdalla, Said S.E.H. Elnashaie. Fluidized bed reactors without and with selective membranes for the catalytic. Hermann C., Quicker P., Dittmeyer R. Mathematical simulation of catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene in a composite palladium membrane reactor. Journal of Membrane Science. ; ()– doi: /S(97) E. Drioli, A. Criscuoli, Microporous inorganic and polymeric membranes as catalytic reactors and membrane contactors, Recent Advances in Gas Separation by Microporous Ceramic Membranes, /S(00), (), ().

Styrene is an important monomer in the manufacture of thermoplastic. Most of it is produced by the catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. In this process that depends on reversible reactions, the yield is usually limited by the establishment of thermodynamic equilibrium in the reactor. The styrene yield can be increased by using a hybrid process, with reaction and separation simultaneously. A set of intrinsic rate equations based on the Hougen—Watson formalism was derived for the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene into styrene on a commercial potassium-promoted iron catalyst. The model discrimination and parameter estimation was based on an extensive set of experiments that were conducted in a tubular reactor. Experimental data were obtained for a range of temperatures, space. The catalytic membrane reactor used to couple the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with the hydrogenat ion of nitrobenzene to aniline is shown schematically in F ig. 1. Fig. 1: Scheme of the integrated catalytic membrane re actor. The reactor is composed of two compartments, i.e. s hell and tube, each packed completely with catalyst particle s. [6] Won Jaelee, "Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenation into Styrene, Kinetic Modeling and Reactor Simulation", Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University, December [7] Kevin J. Schwint, Richard J. Wilcox, " Process for the production of styrene monomer by improving energy efficiency and injecting a recycle.